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Normal dose of lasix iv


Furosemide binding to albumin may be reduced in elderly patients. Furosemide is predominantly excreted unchanged in the urine. The renal clearance of furosemide after intravenous administration in older healthy male subjects ( years of age) is statistically significantly smaller than in younger healthy male subjects ( years of age). Lasix iv push rate - Normal dose of lasix iv - How to use google adwords keyword research tool Posted on April 6, After 5 months in Australia it is finally time to return to La Paz and Sonrisa – lots of changes as we move ashore and get Sonrisa ready for charters. Initially, 80— mg IV or IM; repeat the dose every 1—2 hours as needed based on clinical response. Less severe cases may use smaller doses every 2—4 hours. Initiate saline administration before the first dose of furosemide to avoid volume contraction which may limit the desired calciuric response.
Initial dose: 20 to 40 mg IV (slowly over 1 to 2 minutes) or IM once; may repeat with the same dose or increase by 20 mg no sooner than 2 hours after the previous dose . mg/kg (or 40 mg) IV over minutes; may be increased to 80 mg if there is no adequate response within 1 hour;not to exceed mg/dose Hyperkalemia in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). The usual initial dose of furosemide is 20 mg to 40 mg given as a single dose, injected intramuscularly or intravenously. The intravenous dose should be given slowly (1 to 2 .


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On the other hand, the efficiency of furosemide is reduced in these patients, due to intratubular albumin binding and to reduced tubular secretion. Moderate The pharmacologic effects of isoproterenol may cause an increase in blood pressure. The American Academy of Pediatrics states that furosemide may be useful as adjunctive therapy in patients with resistant hypertension, especially if concomitant renal disease is present. Furosemide may sometimes attenuate the effects of other drugs e. Normal dose of lasix iv Medscape - Hypertension-specific dosing for Lasix (furosemide), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, contraindications, pregnancy & lactation schedules, and cost information.  Normal saline may be used for volume replacement. Dopamine or norepinephrine may be used to treat hypotension. If dysrhythmia due to decreased potassium or magnesium is suspected, replace aggressively.  Administer undiluted IV injections at rate of mg/min; not to exceed 4 mg/min for short-term intermittent infusion; in children, give mg/kg/min, titrated to effect. Use infusion solution within 24 hours. Previous. DESCRIPTION Lasix is a diuretic which is an anthranilic acid derivative. Lasix tablets for oral administration contain furosemide as the active ingredient and the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate NF, magnesium stearate NF, starch NF, talc USP, and colloidal silicon dioxide NF. Chemically, it is 4­ chloro-N-furfurylsulfamoylanthranilic acid. Lasix is available as white tablets for oral administration in dosage strengths of 20, 40 and 80 mg. Furosemide is a white to off-white odorless crystalline powder. It is practically insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol, fr. Learn about Lasix (Furosemide) may treat, uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications.  LASIX® is a diuretic which is an anthranilic acid derivative. LASIX tablets for oral administration contain furosemide as the active ingredient and the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate NF, magnesium stearate NF, starch NF, talc USP, and colloidal silicon dioxide NF. Chemically, it is 4-chloro-N-furfurylsulfamoylanthranilic acid. LASIX is available as white tablets for oral administration in dosage strengths of 20, 40 and 80 mg. Furosemide is a white to off-white odorless crystalline powder. It is practically insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol, freely soluble.

Minor Monitor for an increase in cabozantinib-related adverse reactions if coadministration with furosemide is necessary. MRP2 inhibitors have the potential to increase plasma concentrations of cabozantinib; however, the clinical relevance of this interaction is unknown. Calcium Carbonate; Magnesium Hydroxide: Moderate Concomitant use of medicines with potential to alter renal perfusion or function such as diuretics, may increase the risk of acute phosphate nephropathy in patients receiving sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate; sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous.

In addition, loop diuretics may increase the risk of hypokalemia especially in patients receiving prolonged therapy with laxatives. Moderate When canagliflozin is initiated in patients already receiving diuretics, symptomatic hypotension can occur.

Patients with impaired renal function eGFR Candesartan: Moderate The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to capreomycin may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including loop diuretics. Ototoxicity from furosemide or other loop diuretics, while uncommon, can be a transient or permanent side effect of significance.

Ototoxicity is best documented with the loop diuretics ethacrynic acid and furosemide, but may also occur with either bumetanide or torsemide. The exact mechanism by which furosemide or other loop diuretics produce ototoxicity is unknown. Usually, reports indicate that furosemide ototoxicity is associated with rapid injection, severe renal impairment, higher than recommended dosages or infusion rates, or concomitant therapy with aminoglycoside antibiotics, ethacrynic acid, or other ototoxic drugs.

If loop diuretics and capreomycin are used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function parameters, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations during therapy. Moderate Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.

Moderate Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics, increasing the risk of proarrhythmic effects of cardiac glycosides. Potassium levels should be monitored and normalized prior to and during concurrent diuretic administration and these agents.

Moderate Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients who are at risk for hypotension, such as those receiving cariprazine in combination with antihypertensive agents. Atypical antipsychotics may cause orthostatic hypotension and syncope, most commonly during treatment initiation and dosage increases.

Patients should be informed about measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning, or rising slowly from a seated position. Consider a cariprazine dose reduction if hypotension occurs. Moderate Nephrotoxicity associated with cephalosporins may be potentiated by concomitant furosemide therapy.

Clinicans should be aware that this may occur even in patients with minor or transient renal impairment. Severe Nephrotoxicity associated with cephalosporins may be potentiated by concomitant furosemide therapy. Minor Cefepime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses.

The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted. Minor Cefotaxime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics.

Minor Cefprozil's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Minor Ceftazidime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Minor Cefuroxime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics.

Moderate If a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDs concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. NSAIDs may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients.

NSAIDs have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain.

Major According to the manufacturer, coadministration of furosemide with chloral hydrate is not recommended. Intravenous administration of furosemide within 24 hours of taking chloral hydrate has resulted in flushing, sweating, restlessness, nausea, increased blood pressure, and tachycardia in isolated cases.

Moderate Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: The manufacturer of colestipol recommends administering other drugs at least 1 hour before or at least hours after the administration of colestipol and that the interval between the administration of colestipol and other drugs should be as long as possible. Severe The administration of cidofovir with another potentially nephrotoxic agent, such as diuretics, is contraindicated.

Diuretics should be discontinued at least 7 days prior to beginning cidofovir. Major Cisapride should be used with great caution in patients receiving potassium-wasting diuretic therapies, such as loop diuretics. Drugs that are associated with depletion of electrolytes may cause cisapride-induced cardiac arrhythmias. Moderate Concurrent use of cisplatin and other agents known to be ototoxic e.

Usually, reports indicate that furosemide ototoxicity is associated with rapid injection, severe renal impairment, higher than recommended furosemide dosages or infusion rates, hypoproteinemia, or concomitant therapy with other ototoxic drugs. Additive effects of cisplatin and loop diuretics on renal parameters and electrolyte balance should also be considered. Saline hydration and diuretic use are common during cisplatin therapy to manage hydration status. If furosemide and cisplatin are used together, it is prudent to monitor renal function parameters and serum electrolyte concentrations during co-therapy.

Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups. Moderate Citalopram causes dose-dependent QT interval prolongation.

Concurrent use of citalopram and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of developing QT prolongation. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of citalopram and diuretics.

In addition, patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with citalopram may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH.

Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of citalopram should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Major Caution is advisable during concurrent use of clozapine and loop diuretics. Treatment with clozapine has been associated with QT prolongation, torsade de pointes TdP , cardiac arrest, and sudden death.

Concurrent use of clozapine and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Major Use of cocaine with antihypertensive agents may increase the antihypertensive effects of the antihypertensive medications or may potentiate cocaine-induced sympathetic stimulation.

Moderate Fish oil supplements may cause mild, dose-dependent reductions in systolic or diastolic blood pressure in untreated hypertensive patients.

Relatively high doses of fish oil are required to produce any blood pressure lowering effect. Additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. Moderate High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect.

It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. Moderate Co-enzyme Q10, ubiquinone CoQ10 may lower blood pressure.

CoQ10 use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals. Patients who choose to take CoQ10 concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring. Patients should be advised to inform their prescriber of their use of CoQ Moderate There is potential for additive hypotensive effects when conivaptan is coadministered with antihypertensive agents.

Moderate Use cosyntropin cautiously in patients receiving diuretics. Cosyntropin may accentuate the electrolyte loss associated with diuretic therapy. Moderate Coadministration of furosemide and cyclosporine increases the risk of gouty arhtritis.

This is a result of furosemide-induced hyperuricemia and the impairment of renal urate excretion by cyclosporine. Moderate Loop diuretics can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by producing an increase in blood glucose concentrations. Patients receiving dapagliflozin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted.

Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between these drugs and all antidiabetic agents. Minor Diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms. Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: Moderate The manufacturer of dasabuvir; ombitasvir; paritaprevir; ritonavir and ombitasvir; paritaprevir; ritonavir recommends caution and clinical monitoring if administered concurrently with furosemide. Use of these drugs in combination has resulted in elevated furosemide maximum plasma concentrations Cmax.

Individualize the dose of furosemide based on the patient's clinical response. The dose should be re-adjusted after completion of the hepatitis C treatment regimen.

Moderate The manufacturer of dasabuvir; ombitasvir; paritaprevir; ritonavir recommends caution and clinical monitoring if administered concurrently with furosemide. The dose should be re-adjusted after completion of the 4-drug hepatitis C treatment regimen.

Major Desmopressin, when used in the treatment of nocturia is contraindicated with loop diuretics because of the risk of severe hyponatremia. Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH.

Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Moderate Dexmethylphenidate can reduce the hypotensive effect of antihypertensive agents, including loop diuretics. Periodic evaluation of blood pressure is advisable during concurrent use of dexmethylphenidate and antihypertensive agents, particularly during initial coadministration and after dosage increases of dexmethylphenidate.

Moderate Quinidine can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents due to the potential for additive hypotension. Moderate Additive hypotensive effects can occur with the concomitant administration of diazoxide with loop diuretics.

This interaction can be therapeutically advantageous, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly. The manufacturer advises that IV diazoxide should not be administered to patients within 6 hours of receiving other antihypertensive agents. Moderate Use dichlorphenamide and diuretics together with caution. Dichlorphenamide increases potassium excretion and can cause hypokalemia and should be used cautiously with other drugs that may cause hypokalemia including loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics.

Measure potassium concentrations at baseline and periodically during dichlorphenamide treatment. If hypokalemia occurs or persists, consider reducing the dose or discontinuing dichlorphenamide therapy. Major Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of loop diuretics.

Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. Major Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics increasing the potential for dofetilide-induced torsade de pointes.

Potassium levels should be within the normal range prior and during administration of dofetilide. Major The manufacturer warns that the coadministration of dolasetron with diuretics associated with hypokalemia could increase the risk of QT prolongation.

Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics increasing the potential for cardiac arrhythmias. Potassium levels should be within the normal range prior to and during therapy with dolasetron. Moderate Caution is advised when using droperidol in combination with loop diuretics which may lead to electrolyte abnormalities, especially hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, as such abnormalities may increase the risk for QT prolongation or cardiac arrhythmias.

Moderate When empagliflozin is initiated in patients already receiving loop diuretics, volume depletion can occur. Patients with impaired renal function, low systolic blood pressure, or who are elderly may also be at a greater risk for volume depletion and perhaps symptomatic hypotension.

Before initiating empagliflozin in patients with one or more of these characteristics, volume status should be assessed and corrected.

Monitor for signs and symptoms after initiating therapy. Loop diuretics can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by producing an increase in blood glucose concentrations. Patients receiving empagliflozin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted.

Minor Loop diurectics may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria in patients with diabetes mellitus, probably due to diuretic-induced hypokalemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between these drugs and all antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin. Moderate General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Major The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics, such as ephedrine, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by loop diuretics.

Blood pressure and heart rates should be monitored closely to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved. Moderate Epoprostenol can have additive effects when administered with other antihypertensive agents.

These effects can be used to therapeutic advantage, but dosage adjustments may be necessary. Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with escitalopram may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH. Discontinuation of escitalopram should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.

Moderate Proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole, have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Minor Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormone therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness. Moderate Fentanyl may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone.

Adjustments to diuretic therapy may be needed in some patients. In addition, opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with diuretics. Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with fluoxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH.

Discontinuation of fluoxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Moderate Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents. Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with fluvoxamine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH.

Discontinuation of fluvoxamine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Moderate Avoid concurrent use of loop diuretics with foscarnet.

Coadministration may impair the renal tubular secretion of foscarnet, thereby increasing the possibility for toxicity. When use of a diuretic is indicated in patients being treated with foscarnet, consider a thiazide diuretic. Gallium Ga 68 Dotatate: Moderate Mannitol can potentiate the effects of other diuretics when these drugs are administered concurrently.

Major Ginseng may decrease the effectiveness of loop diuretics. One case report described a temporal relationship between the use of ginseng and resistance to furosemide therapy, resulting in edema, hypertension, and hospitalization on 2 separate occasions. Other nutritional products were taken concurrently by the patient were not specified in the report.

A mechanism of action or causal relationship has not been definitively established. Moderate According to the manufacturer, caution is warranted when administering granisetron to patients with preexisting electrolyte abnormalities. Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics, increasing the potential for cardiac arrhythmias. Major QT prolongation has been observed during haloperidol treatment.

Use of haloperidol and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of haloperidol and loop diuretics.

In general, haloperidol should also be used cautiously with antihypertensive agents due to the possibility of additive hypotension. Moderate Hawthorn, Crataegus laevigata may lower peripheral vascular resistance. Hawthorn use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals.

Patients receiving hawthorn concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring. Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate; Pseudoephedrine: Moderate When the intravenous formulation of ibandronate is used for the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy, combination therapy with loop diuretics should be used with caution in order to avoid hypocalcemia.

Moderate Ibuprofen lysine may reduce the effect of diuretics; diuretics can increase the risk of nephrotoxicity of NSAIDs in dehydrated patients. During coadministration of NSAIDs and diuretic therapy, patients should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy and for signs and symptoms of renal impairment.

Moderate Secondary to alpha-blockade, iloperidone can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use with antihypertensive agents.

If concurrent use of iloperidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position.

Moderate Further reductions in blood pressure may occur when inhaled iloprost is administered to patients receiving other antihypertensive agents. Moderate Hypokalemia may occur due to excessive diuresis during inamrinone therapy.

Fluid and electrolyte changes and renal function should be carefully monitored during inamrinone therapy. Moderate Use caution with concomitant use of inotersen and diuretics due to the risk of glomerulonephritis and nephrotoxicity. Minor Monitor patients receiving insulin closely for worsening glycemic control when bumetanide, furosemide, and torsemide are instituted. Bumetanide, furosemide, and torsemide may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria in patients with diabetes mellitus, probably due to diuretic-induced hypokalemia.

Moderate Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors MAOIs are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with diuretics.

Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider. Moderate The pharmacologic effects of isoproterenol may cause an increase in blood pressure. If isoproterenol is used concomitantly with antihypertensives, the blood pressure should be monitored as the administration of isoproterenol can compromise the effectiveness of antihypertensive agents.

Moderate Closely monitor for furosemide-induced side effects such as excessive fluid loss or hypotension when these drugs are used together. In some patients, a dosage reduction of furosemide may be required. Following oral administration, leflunomide is metabolized to an active metabolite, teriflunomide, which is responsible for essentially all of leflunomide's in vivo activity.

Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of the renal uptake organic anion transporter OAT3. Use of teriflunomide with furosemide, a substrate of OAT3, may increase furosemide plasma concentrations. Moderate Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics, increasing the risk of proarrhythmic effects of levomethadyl. Moderate Use high doses more than 80 mg of furosemide and thyroid hormones together with caution.

High doses of furosemide may inhibit the binding of thyroid hormones to carrier proteins, resulting in a transient increase in free thyroid hormones followed by an overall decrease in total thyroid hormone concentrations.

Major Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of some antihypertensive agents. Moderate Loop diuretics may increase serum lithium concentrations by increasing lithium reabsorption in the proximal tubule, and possibly by decreasing lithium reabsorption in the loop of Henle with an increase in lithium delivery to the distal tubule with minor compensatory reabsorption.

However, the effect of loop diuretics on lithium clearance relative to thiazide diuretics is generally minor. According to the Beers Criteria, concurrent use of lithium and loop diuretics may result in a clinically important drug interaction, particularly in older adults. The Beers expert panel recommends avoiding concurrent use due to an increased risk of lithium toxicity. If the combination is necessary, monitoring of lithium concentrations is recommended.

Moderate Due to the antagonism of lurasidone at alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, the drug may enhance the hypotensive effects of alpha-blockers and other antihypertensive agents. If concurrent use of lurasidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position.

Moderate Diuretics may interfere with the kidneys ability to regulate magnesium concentrations. Long-term use of diuretics may impair the magnesium-conserving ability of the kidneys and lead to hypomagnesemia. Long-term use of loop diuretics may impair the magnesium-conserving ability of the kidneys and lead to hypomagnesemia. In addition, use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preparation in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.

Moderate Use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preparation in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics. Moderate Use caution and closely monitor for increased adverse effects during concurrent administration of maraviroc and furosemide as increased maraviroc concentrations may occur. The effects of this transporter on the concentrations of maraviroc are unknown, although an increase in concentrations and thus, toxicity, are possible.

Minor Loop diuretics have been associated with hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between loop diuretics and all antidiabetic agents.

Monitor for a loss of diabetic control. Minor Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; monitor patients receiving concurrent therapy to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is being obtained. Moderate Diuretics can cause electrolyte disturbances such as hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia, which may prolong the QT interval.

As methadone may also prolong the QT interval, cautious coadministration with diuretics is needed. Moderate Loop diuretics may increase the risk of hypokalemia if used concurrently with methazolamide. There may also be an additive diuretic or hyperuricemic effect. Moderate Concurrent use of methohexital and antihypertensive agents increases the risk of developing hypotension. Moderate Furosemide undergoes significant renal tubular secretion.

Concomitant administration of furosemide with other drugs that undergo significant renal tubular secretion, such as methotrexate, may result in decreased effect of furosemide and, conversely, decreased elimination of the other drug. High dose treatment of both furosemide and other drugs that undergo renal tubular secretion may result in increased toxicity of both drugs. Moderate Methylphenidate can reduce the hypotensive effect of antihypertensive agents such as loop diuretics. Periodic evaluation of blood pressure is advisable during concurrent use of methylphenidate and antihypertensive agents, particularly during initial coadministration and after dosage increases of methylphenidate.

Moderate Concurrent administration of antihypertensive agents could lead to additive hypotension when administered with milrinone. Titrate milrinone dosage according to hemodynamic response.

Moderate Hyponatremia has been reported very rarely during mirtazapine administration. Caution is advisable in patients receiving medications known to cause hyponatremia, such as diuretics.

Hyponatremia may manifest as headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness which may result in falls. Severe manifestations include hallucinations, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death. Symptomatic hyponatremia may require discontinuation of mirtazapine, as well as implementation of the appropriate medical interventions.

Moderate Morphine may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone. Morphine may also cause acute urinary retention by causing a spasm of the bladder sphincter; men with enlarged prostates may have a higher risk of this reaction. Minor Although relatively infrequent, nefazodone may cause orthostatic hypotension in some patients; this effect may be additive with antihypertensive agents.

Blood pressure monitoring and dosage adjustments of either drug may be necessary. Major The potential for hypotension may be increased when coadministering nesiritide with antihypertensive agents. Moderate Additive hypotensive effects may occur when nitroprusside is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. Dosages should be adjusted carefully, according to blood pressure. Moderate Because patients should be well-hydrated prior to the administration of contrast media, loop diuretics such as furosemide that cause intravascular volume depletion might increase the risk of nephrotoxicity when using radiopaque contrast agents.

Other studies have shown no benefit with combination therapy. Moderate Diuretics can cause decreased arterial responsiveness to norepinephrine, but the effect is not sufficient to preclude their coadministration. Moderate Patients receiving diuretics or other agents to control fluid and electrolyte balance may require dosage adjustments while receiving octreotide due to additive effects.

Moderate The coadministration of ondansetron with diuretics associated with hypokalemia could increase the risk of QT prolongation. Potassium levels should be within the normal range prior to and during therapy with ondansetron.

Major Patients receiving loop diuretics during oprelvekin, rh-IL therapy are at increased risk for developing severe hypokalemia; close monitoring of fluid and electrolyte status is warranted during concurrent diuretic and oprelvekin therapy. Major The vasoconstricting actions of oxymetazoline, an alpha adrenergic agonist, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics.

If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for changes in blood pressure. Moderate Paliperidone may cause orthostatic hypotension, thereby enhancing the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients receiving this combination who are susceptible to hypotension. Moderate Because both loop diuretics and intravenously administered bisphosphonates i.

Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with paroxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH. Discontinuation of paroxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Major Cautious use of pasireotide and medicines that can affect potassium or magnesium concentrations such as diuretics is advised.

Assess the patient's potassium and magnesium concentration before and periodically during pasireotide receipt. Correct hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia before pasireotide receipt. Since pentamidine may cause QT prolongation independently of electrolyte imbalances, the risk for cardiac arrhythmias is potentiated by the concomitant use of agents associated with electrolyte loss.

Moderate Pentoxifylline has been used concurrently with antihypertensive drugs beta blockers, diuretics without observed problems. Small decreases in blood pressure have been observed in some patients treated with pentoxifylline; periodic systemic blood pressure monitoring is recommended for patients receiving concomitant antihypertensives.

If indicated, dosage of the antihypertensive agents should be reduced. Moderate Topiramate is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Concurrent use of topiramate with non-potassium sparing diuretics e. Monitor baseline and periodic potassium concentrations during coadministration.

Moderate Limited clinical data suggest that phenytoin can interfere with the clinical response to furosemide. Phenytoin has been shown to decrease furosemide oral bioavailability by up to 50 percent without affecting its systemic clearance. Major Pimozide is associated with a well-established risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes TdP.

Use of pimozide and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of pimozide and loop diuretics. According to the manufacturer, potassium deficiencies should be correctly prior to treatment with pimozide and normalized potassium levels should be maintained during treatment. Moderate Loop diuretics may increase the risk of hypokalemia, especially in patients receiving prolonged therapy with laxatives such as calcium polycarbophil.

Moderate There have been rare reports of generalized tonic-clonic seizures associated with electrolyte abnormalities in patients using polyethylene glycol colon preparation products.

In addition, there have been rare reports of serious arrhythmias associated with the use of ionic osmotic laxative products for bowel preparation. Some of these events are associated with electrolyte imbalance.

Therefore, polyethylene glycol; electrolytes preparations should be used with caution in patients using concomitant medications that increase the risk of electrolyte abnormalities such as loop diuretics. Polyethylene Glycol; Electrolytes; Ascorbic Acid: Polyethylene Glycol; Electrolytes; Bisacodyl: Moderate Systemic polymyxin B is nephrotoxic and should be used cautiously with loop diuretics, which may cause azotemia and may increase the risk for renal toxicity when coadministered.

Close monitoring of renal status and for drug toxicity is recommended. Diminishing urine output and a rising BUN are indications to discontinue systemic polymyxin B therapy. Monitor patient for diabetic control. Moderate Prazosin is well-known to produce a 'first-dose' phenomenon. Some patients develop significant hypotension shortly after administration of the first dose. The first dose response acute postural hypotension of prazosin may be exaggerated in patients who are receiving beta-adrenergic blockers, diuretics, or other antihypertensive agents.

Concomitant administration of prazosin with other antihypertensive agents is not prohibited, however. This can be therapeutically advantageous, but lower dosages of each agent should be used. Moderate Probenecid can interfere with the natriuresis and plasma renin activity increases caused by diuretics such as furosemide. Furosemide can in turn increase the levels of serum uric acid, antagonizing the effects of probenecid.

Moderate Procainamide can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents. Intravenous administration of procainamide is more likely to cause hypotensive effects. Major QT prolongation has occurred during concurrent use of quetiapine and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of quetiapine and loop diuretics. Major Risperidone may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.

Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of risperidone may be necessary in patients receiving antihypertensive agents concomitantly. Furthermore, two of four placebo-controlled trials showed that elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis receiving the combination of risperidone and furosemide had a higher incidence of mortality than those receiving either agent alone.

The mechanism for this adverse association is unknown. Caution should be exercised when the combined use of risperidone and furosemide is necessary in those with dementia-related psychosis. Moderate Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.

Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: Moderate Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with sertraline may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion SIADH.

Discontinuation of sertraline should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia. Moderate During clinical trials with silodosin, the incidence of dizziness and orthostatic hypotension was higher in patients receiving concomitant antihypertensive treatment.

Thus, caution is advisable when silodosin is administered with antihypertensive agents. Sodium picosulfate; Magnesium oxide; Anhydrous citric acid: Moderate Use caution when prescribing sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.

In addition, use caution in patients receiving drugs where hypokalemia is a particular risk. Moderate Sodium polystyrene sulfonate should be used cautiously with other agents that can induce hypokalemia such as loop diuretics, insulins, or intravenous sodium bicarbonate. Because of differences in onset of action, sodium polystyrene sulfonate is often used with these agents. With appropriate monitoring, hypokalemia can be avoided.

Risk versus benefit should be addressed in patients receiving diuretics and solifenacin. Minor Because streptozocin is nephrotoxic, concurrent or subsequent administration of other nephrotoxic agents e. Major According to the manufacturer for furosemide, simultaneous administration of sucralfate and furosemide may reduce its natriuretic and antihypertensive effects. The intake of furosemide and sucralfate is recommended to be separated by at least two hours.

Moderate Concurrent or sequential use of telavancin with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs such as loop diuretics may lead to additive nephrotoxicity. Closely monitor renal function and adjust telavancin doses based on calculated creatinine clearance. Moderate Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of the renal uptake organic anion transporter OAT3. Monitor for increased adverse effects from furosemide, such as excessive fluid loss or hypotension.

Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of tetracaine and antihypertensive agents. Moderate Concurrent use of thiopental and alpha-blockers or antihypertensive agents increases the risk of developing hypotension. Moderate Thiothixene should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents.

Treatment of hypertension alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. Adjust to minimum effective dose. If increasing azotemia and oliguria occur during treatment of severe progressive renal disease: A further reduction in dosage or even discontinuation of the other agents may be required.

This drug is a potent diuretic which, if given in excessive amounts, can lead to profound diuresis with water and electrolyte depletion. Therefore, careful medical supervision is required and dose schedule must be adjusted to the individual patient's needs. Parenteral administration should be used only in patients unable to take oral medication or in emergency situations and should be replaced with oral therapy as soon as practical.

The manufacturer product information should be consulted. Acid solutions, including other parenteral medications e. Do not add this drug to a running IV line containing any of these acidic products. Serum electrolytes and carbon dioxide frequently during the first few months and periodically thereafter.

BUN and creatinine frequently during the first few months and periodically thereafter. Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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Moderate Morphine may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone. Minor Furosemide may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria in patients with diabetes mellitus, probably due to diuretic-induced hypokalemia. Polyethylene Glycol; Electrolytes; Bisacodyl: You've chosen to add topics from the topic group to your selected topics. Normal dose of lasix iv
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